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Have you ever heard of beachcombing? It’s when you go to the beach to look for valuable or interesting things. It was first mentioned in a memoir "Two Years Before the Mast" written by Richard Henry Dana Jr., published in 1840.

The best things to look for when beachcombing are moon snail eggs, shark egg cases, abalone shells, Razorfish, Anemone cones, Cuttlefish bones, Paper nautilus, sponges, sea urchins and surf crabs. Follow the guide below for you to get the most out of your beachcombing experience.

The Gears and the Must-haves

It is highly advisable to wear scuba booties since they provide high-level of protection against sharp objects and they grip tightly on slippery surfaces.

You can bring 2 bags – one canvas bag and one plastic bag. The plastic bag is for you to pick-up trashes so you are also helping the ocean along the way. Also bring a camera (optional), willies, warm clothes, penknife, hand lens, specimen pots and antibacterial hand gel (if possible).

Wear sunscreen or protective clothing!

Mother and Daughter Beachcombing

The Rules To Follow

Never kills or bring home a live animal with you. This includes fishes, turtles, crabs, starfishes and some plants. If you see a dead starfish, leave it and go. It is also important to know the place’s restrictions on endangered species.

Always exercise caution. Be mindful of wildlife, the weather, sea condition, hazardous trash, etc.

In case you want to take something, make sure that you are not taking someone’s home.

The Perfect Time

The ideal conditions for beachcombing are: During the winter, early in the morning, during low tide and right after the storm. Also, remember to come earlier before everyone else.

The Ideal Place

You don’t need an ocean to do beachcombing. If there are lakes and creeks in your neighborhood, those are great spots for you to spend a lazy afternoon with. These waterways are connected to the ocean anyway.

Beachcombing shells

Photo by www.eatsleepplaybeaufort.com

However, for those who are in for seaside beach hunting this summer, continue reading! We have compiled some of the best beachcombers delight in the United States, from east to west coast. Who cares if summer isn’t coming anytime soon yet. Better be prepared earlier, right? After all, a day at the beach isn’t really complete without strolling at the shore. And for some, beachcombing is a serious business. So here is our list. Ready, set, go!

Block Island, Rhode Island

The shores of Block Island are sandy but the stony part offers the best beachcombing opportunities. Here, you can see giant scallop shells, seagrasses, and sand dollars. After a big storm, you can join the locals that are scavenging for Native American artifacts that are sometimes uncovered by the waves.

Calvert Cliffs State Park, Maryland

This park is a freshwater and tidal marshland that is a prime spot for hunting fossils and other beachside treasures. There have been more than 600 species of fossils that have been discovered on the beaches and surrounding cliffs. It includes oysters from the Miocene era (approximately 10 to 20 million years old) and a fossilized genus of scallop called Chesapectens, which is believed to have lived between the Miocene and Pleistocene eras. Best time to come is after the storm or during low tide.

The Beaches of Fort Myers and Sanibel Island, Florida

The Beaches of Fort Myers and Sanibel Island are known to be the paradise of seashell enthusiasts. This is courtesy of the Gulf of Mexico’s consistent currents, which gently waves hundreds of thousands of shells each day coming from the Caribbean to the north of Florida. The result? You can always find a variety of intact seashells, including horse conchs, calico scallops, and corkscrew-shaped augers.

Glass Beach, Hawaii

If you want to score some sea glasses, visit Glass Beach in Hawaii. This is because of this place as once a dumping ground for bottles and automotive glass courtesy of Swiss Cheese Shoreline. No need for a shovel – you can treasure hunt some green, blue, brown and clear pieces of glass in different shapes and sizes.

Glass Beach Beachcombing

Photo by www.onlyinyourstate.com

If you want to score some sea glasses, visit Glass Beach in Hawaii. This is because of this place as once a dumping ground for bottles and automotive glass courtesy of Swiss Cheese Shoreline. No need for a shovel – you can treasure hunt some green, blue, brown and clear pieces of glass in different shapes and sizes.

Do you know other places best for beachcombing? Comment it below! If you liked this article please share it! SHARING IS CARING!