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A lake is a body of water surrounded by land area. It is different from rivers or streams which usually flows. Most of the time, water from lakes comes from river or stream. They are also usually formed out of melting glaciers and rift zones. Other lakes are man-made and are constructed for many purposes such as aesthetic reasons, hydro-electric power generation, recreational purposes, industrial use, agricultural use or domestic water supply. Below is a list of the deepest natural lakes in the world.

Lake Baikal – Russia
5,387 feet / 1,620 meters

Lake Baikal is known for having two titles: largest freshwater lake and the deepest lake in the world at 5,387 feet. At an estimated age of 20 – 25 million years, Lake Baikal is also the oldest lake in the world. It was formed as an ancient rift valley for its crescent shape. It also holds 20% of the world’s unfrozen freshwater. Endemism also happens in the lake for being home to thousands of species of plants and animals that only exist there.

Lake Tanganyika – between Zambia, Burundi, and Tanzania
4,710 feet / 1,436 meters

The second largest freshwater lake in the world, Lake Tanganyika is located at the border between Zambia, Burundi, and Tanzania. In its boundary are six large islands and other smaller islands.  Tanganyika’s shape is somewhat long and narrow but has terrific biodiversity. People living near the lake shores have made a living by fishing there since the Stone Age.

Caspian Sea
3,360 feet / 1,025 meters

The Caspian Sea is a lake, however, it is called a sea and not a lake because the Ancient Romans that arrived there found out that the water was salty.  It is the world’s largest fully enclosed body of water on Earth and the world’s largest salt lake which stretches around 750 miles.

Lake Vostok
2,950 feet/900 meters

Antarctica’s finest, this lake is the rarest because it is buried under almost 2.5 miles (4 km) of ice. It is the largest sub-glacial lake ever known. It has around 1,300 cubic miles of freshwater, 1,600 feet beneath the surface of the ice.